Tag mindsets

Carol Dweck on Helping Kids Move From the Tyranny of Now Into the Power of Yet …*

In this short TEDx talk, psychologist Carol Dweck gives an overview of her research on the power of mindset to facilitate or hinder children’s capacity to connect with and activate their potential. The ways in which children frame and cope with challenges and difficulties have enormous implications on their ability to thrive. Students with a fixed mindset are prisoners to the tyranny of the now, believing that each challenge is a reflection of a fixed level of a given capacity–be it intelligence, creativity or athleticism. Meanwhile, students with a growth mindset luxuriate in the power of yet, understanding that each new challenge is an opportunity to learn something new and to practice and refine skills. Dweck shares some tips and strategies for helping students move from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset–praising process rather than intelligence to help students redefine things like effort and difficulty, for example.

watch & rethink …* 

How Do You Cultivate Happiness & Well-Being In Your Life?

How Do You Cultivate Happiness & Well-Being In Your Life?  | rethinked.org

I haven’t yet had a chance to do the gratitude night exercise suggested by Martin Seligman in Authentic Happiness, so I have no Positive Psychology interventions to report on today. I thought I’d ask YOU about how you go about cultivating happiness and well-being in your daily life. What habits, actions, tools or mindsets have you tried and adopted to nurture and increase your well-being? How do you make yourself happy?

Let me know * 

Carol Dweck On The Power Of Mindset To Help Children (& Adults) Reach Their Potential …*

Carol Dweck On The Power Of Mindset To Help Children (& Adults) Reach Their Potential ...* | rethinked.org

 

If you haven’t yet had time to read Carol Dweck‘s brilliant book on the power of mindsets to shape students’ motivation and learning, or if you have read it and just can’t get enough–I highly recommend the video below. In a lecture given at the RSA in September 2013, Dweck summarizes the key findings from her work on mindsets and gives some practical tips for translating those insights into impact.

How To Help Every Child Fulfill Their Potential – Carol Dweck via The RSA, published September 18, 2013

Issues of Confidence & Permission in Wanting to Make A Difference…*

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to observe the EdgeMakers workshop, led by John Kao, with the entire ninth grade class of the Riverdale Country School. EdgeMakers is a new organization, founded by Kao in November 2012, with the mission of empowering young people everywhere to become innovators and make a difference. EdgeMakers hopes to be a resource for young innovators, giving them “a new set of “edge capacities” that include the ability to create and manage the creativity of others; communicate with empathy; be a proactive catalyst; collaborate with a diverse, global, ever-changing array of partners; innovate; and to cultivate the emotional intelligence needed to manage, lead, and inspire.”

About EdgeMakers via EdgeMakersmedia on YouTube, published October 15, 2013.

The students were broken up into eight groups for the day-long workshop and spent the morning rethinking and designing the perfect book bag by following the Lean Startup method. In the afternoon, the students gathered again in their groups, this time to identify opportunities for rethinking throughout the school, and worked collaboratively to design solutions to their chosen challenges.

The workshop was a resounding success, with the students learning and practicing some key tools and techniques necessary to affect positive change in their lives and environments–rapid prototyping, giving and receiving feedback, identifying pain points, and collaborating in diverse teams.

It’s great that these students are being equipped with the tools and processes that they need to transform their dreams and ideas into impact but, in my mind, the most valuable contribution an initiative like EdgeMakers can make, is to give these students the right mindset and confidence to be change agents; the sense that they do not need to wait for permission to take control of their environments and rethink their lives and those of others for the better.

A couple days prior to the EdgeMakers workshop, I attended a book party with Tom and David Kelley for the launch of their new book, Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All, and although I have not yet had a chance to read it, the Kelley brothers’ assertion that we are all creative and that it’s just a question of removing the blocks that we acquire in the process of growing up so that we may realize our creative potential resonated deeply with my own experience. In my life and creative endeavors, I have come to realize that the issue of permission has often gotten in my way and kept me from fully exploring my potential or pursuing in a tangible way many of my ideas. Growing up, I was fortunate enough to attend eleven schools, both public and independent, in three different countries before even reaching high school. Yet despite the wide range of learning models that I was exposed to, the sum total of my education left me with a sense of ingrained obedience and hesitancy. I have had to unlearn the idea that someone else knows (or can know) better than me what I can or cannot accomplish, or that I should wait for someone more knowledgeable to give me the go ahead to pursue my hunches and inclinations. This is why EdgeMaker’s mission and curriculum to empower children and adolescents to make their mark on the world and to translate their ideas into impact is so critically on point and urgent. Education should be about giving learners the tools and mindsets they’ll need to shape and navigate their ever changing world, not to fill them with blocks they have to unlearn in adulthood.

Friday Link Fest…*

Friday Link Fest...* | rethinked.org | Photo by Elsa Fridman

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts” – Winston Churchill

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Rhizomatic Learning Is A Metaphor For How We Learn ~ Rhizomatic learning takes another approach. It freely admits the beautiful complexity of the human experience, and thus, by proximity, the sheer craziness of the learning process. This idea, not so much a learning theory as it is a clever and accurate metaphor, describes learning as having no beginning nor an end. It posits that learners have needs so diverse that the “teacher” is essentially off the hook in meeting every need for every student, no matter how noble that sounds. Within the rhizomatic perspective, “knowledge can only be negotiated, [and is] a personal knowledge-creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated premises.” So, iteration. Design. Try. Monitor. Fail. Reflect. Rethink. Redesign. Reiterate. via Teach Thought, published August 5, 2013.

In Defense of Life Hacking ~ Recently, Slate published an article entitled Down with Lifehacking, arguing that life hacking is just a time-wasting buzzword that doesn’t make anyone’s lives better. Lifehacker’s Whitson Gordon disagrees, here’s why. via Lifehacker, published August 6, 2013.

Daydreaming Can Improve Your Focus ~ Focus and concentration are essential, of course. But so are introspection and reflection, and Immordino-Yang and her colleagues recommend that adults and children find a balance between the two modes: by regularly unplugging our blinking, buzzing devices, and by providing time and space for a quieter, more inward kind of entertainment. via Business Insider, published July 30, 2013.

The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational ~ We’re subject to cognitive biases, those annoying glitches in our thinking that cause us to make questionable decisions and reach erroneous conclusions. Here are a dozen of the most common and pernicious cognitive biases that you need to know about. via io9, published January 9, 2013.

Build a Career Worth Having ~ Insights into what’s lacking in the traditional approach to career planning, and how professionals can create careers with an ongoing sense of purpose. via Harvard Business Review, published August 5, 2013.

Why Fear Of Discomfort Might Be Ruining Your Life ~ The problem is that when you run from discomfort all the time, you are restricted to a small zone of comfort, and so you miss out on most of life. On most of the best things in life, in fact. And you become unhealthy, because if eating healthy food and exercising is uncomfortable, then you go to comfort foods and not moving much. Being unhealthy, unfortunately, is also uncomfortable, so then you seek distractions from this (and the fact that you have debt and too much clutter, etc.) in food and entertainment and shopping (as if spending will solve our problems!) and this in turn makes things worse. Here are some tips for embracing discomfort. via Design Taxi, published August 5, 2013.

Come Out and Play: The Joy of Novice Game Design ~ Come Out and Play is an annual showcase of games open to the public to play. Think Field Day for adults, but with a wild mix of technology-driven experiences, athletic challenges, and whimsical competitions. Games are submitted a few months prior—the application demands proof of play-testing and clearly explained rules—and forty or so are accepted to be featured as either Night Games or Field Day events. The festival started in 2006 as a city-wide game of zombie tag in New York City, and now brings hundreds out to play in San Francisco and New York every summer. via GOOD, published August 8, 2013.

Book-Exchange Benches Supply New Reading Material Everyday ~ Through the end of September, public benches in nine spots around Amsterdam will be supplied with different reading materials every day as part of the Ruilbank project by Pivot Creative. The benches are fitted with red metal clips that can hold a newspaper or a book. People who happen to find themselves on that bench are welcome to read the material, take it home, bring it back or exchange it with another material. via PSFK, published August 7, 2013.

LOOK

The “Celebrity Lecture Series” From Michigan State Features Talks by Great Writers of Our Time The Celebrity Lecture Series was established at Michigan State University in 1988, and it has “featured some of the most illustrious scholars, critics, novelists, poets, and creative artists of our time.” Now, thanks to a special online archive, you can revisit these lectures presented by the likes of Amy TanArthur MillerJoyce Carol OatesKurt Vonnegut, Jr.Margaret AtwoodMaya Angelou, Norman MailerPaul TherouxPhilip RothRichard FordSusan SontagTom WolfeCarlos FuentesAugust WilsonE.L. DoctorowEdward AlbeeIsabel AllendeGarry WillsJane SmileyJohn IrvingJohn Updike and Joseph Heller. via Open Culture, August 6, 2013.

Unique Experimental House “Roll It” ~ Students from University of Karlsruhe, Germany, Christian Zwick and Konstantin Jerabek have designed this unique experimental revolving house called Roll It, based on the concept of “mobile and space-efficient construction”. via The Design Home, published August 18, 2011.

Mushroom Furniture My Merjan Tara Sisman + Brian Mcclellan~ ‘The Living Room Project’ is an exploration into manufacturing objects from living materials. Philadelphia university students Merjan Tara Sisman and Brian Mcclellan investigated the potential of particular organisms and came across mycelium, the rooting system for mushrooms, which they found to be particularly suitable for their intended application of the production of furniture. Through their research, the young designers realized that they could control the growth of the organisms in a variety of different ways within fabricated moulds–a process which they like to think of as a zero energy form of 3D printing. via Designboom, published August 8, 2013.

Assembling a Map of Manhattan Using Only Handwritten Directions From by Strangers ~ New York conceptual artist Nobutaka Aozaki is exploring the act of asking for directions in his ongoing art piece, Here to There, by gathering a collection of impromptu hand-drawn maps he obtains from complete strangers. Dressed as a tourist in a souvenir baseball cap and carrying a Century 21 shopping bag, the artist hits the streets around Manhattan and approaches random pedestrians to inquire about directions through the current part of the map he’s working on. via Colossal, published August 9, 2013.

464 Digital Learning Tools To Sift Through On A Rainy Day ~ via Teach Thought, published August 6, 2013.

The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers ~ via Flavorwire, published August 5, 2013.

WATCH

This Ship Uses Underwater Robots To Livestream Mysteries Of The Deep To Your iPhone ~ The Okeanos, the exploration ship of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is about to set out on another voyage, with a brand new robot sub. via FastCo.Exist, published August 2, 2013.

JR appears on Charlie Rose, talks about his artistic process ~ via TED, published August 5, 2013.

Robert Steven Kaplan: The Value of the Failure Story ~ Harvard Business School’s Robert Steven Kaplan argues in his new book, What You’re Really Meant to Do: A Roadmap for Reaching Your Unique Potential, that success is not about meeting someone else’s definition, but reaching your potential by defining it on your own terms. Here Kaplan advises people to write down the story of their failures in order to make themselves aware of them. via BigThink, published June 4, 2013.

Mindsets: Growth vs. Fixed ~ Your kids’ ticket to engagement vs. anxiety ~ via Greater Good Science Center, published August 5, 2013.

Paul Ekman: Outsmart Evolution and Master Your Emotions ~ Renowned psychologist and emotion-guru Paul Ekman describes how introducing conscious awareness to facial expressions can help one override and control their emotions. via Big Think, published August 1, 2013.

High School Internships Offer Meaningful Real-World Learning ~ 16-year-old Noah finds purpose and learns valuable career skills at a nonprofit two full days a week, while protecting and restoring his local watershed. Internships with deep impact are a key element at his high school, San Diego Met, part of the Big Picture network. via Edutopia, published July 23, 2013.

Trip to the Moon (And Five Other Free Films) by Georges Méliès, the Father of Special Effects ~ via Open Culture, published August 7, 2013.

Michael Shermer: The pattern behind self-deception ~ Michael Shermer says the human tendency to believe strange things — from alien abductions to dowsing rods — boils down to two of the brain’s most basic, hard-wired survival skills. He explains what they are, and how they get us into trouble. via TED, published June 14, 2010.

Daniel H. Cohen On Why We Need To Rethink…* The Metaphors We Use To Think About Cognitive Arguments

In a recent TED talk, philosopher Daniel H. Cohen, challenges us to rethink…* the metaphors that we use to think about arguments so that we may shift our focus away from winning to deeper learning and understanding when we engage in argumentation. Cohen begins his talk by highlighting the three existing models for arguments that we hold:

1. Argument as War: There’s a lot of screaming and shouting and winning and losing. That’s not a very helpful model for thinking about argument, but it’s a pretty entrenched and common model for argument.

 

2. Argument as Proof: Think of a mathematician’s argument: Here’s my argument–does it work? Is it any good? Are the premises warranted? Are the inferences valid? Does the conclusion follow from the premises? No opposition, not necessarily any arguing in the adversarial sense. 

 

3. Argument as Performance: Arguments in front of an audience. We can think of a politician trying to present a position, trying to convince the audience of something. But there’s another twist on this model that I really think is important, namely, that when we argue before an audience, sometimes the audience has a more participatory role in the argument. That is, arguments are also in front of juries who make a judgement, decide the case, let’s call this the rhetorical model.

 

By far the most dominant and pervasive of the three models is the metaphor of argument-as-war.

 

It dominates how we talk about arguments, how we think about arguments, and because of that it shapes how we argue–our actual conduct in arguments. Now, when we talk about arguments, we talk in very militaristic language: we want strong arguments, arguments that have a lot of punch, arguments that are right on target; we want to have our defenses up and our strategies all in order; we want killer arguments. That’s the kind of argument we want. It is the dominant way of thinking about arguments. 

 

The issue with this model for argumentation, as Cohen points out, is that it has deforming effects on how we argue.

 

1. First, it elevates tactics over substance–you take a class in logical argumentation, you learn all about the subterfuges that people use to try and win arguments, the false steps. 

 

2. It magnifies the US vs. THEM aspect, it makes it adversarial, it’s polarizing.

 

3. And the only foreseeable outcomes is glorious victory of ignominious defeat.

 

I think those are deforming effects, and worse of all, it seems to prevent things like negotiation, or deliberation, or compromise or collaboration. Think about that, have you ever entered an argument thinking, let’s see if we can hash something out rather than fight it out? What can we work out together? I think the argument-as-war metaphor inhibits those other kinds of resolutions to argumentation. 

 

Perhaps, the most negative impact of the argument-as-war metaphor with its either-or framework–either I win or I lose–is that we begin to equate learning with losing.

 

If argument is war, then there is an implicit equation of learning with losing. Let me explain what I mean: suppose you and I have an argument. You believe a proposition–P–and I don’t. I say why do you believe P? And you give me your reasons. And I object and say, “well, what about…” and you answer my objection. And I have a question, well what do you mean? How does it apply over here? And you answer my question. Now, suppose at the end of the day, I’ve objected, I’ve questioned, I’ve raised all sorts of counter considerations and, in every case, you’ve responded to my satisfaction. And so, at the end of the day, I say, “you know what? I guess you’re right.” So I have a new belief, and it’s not just any belief, but it’s a well articulated, examined, battle tested belief. Great cognitive gain. Ok, who won that argument? Well, the war metaphor seems to force us into saying you’ve won, even though I’m the only one who made any cognitive gain. What did you gain cognitively from convincing me? [,..] The war metaphor forces us into thinking that you’re the winner and I lost, even though I gained.

 

What we need then, is to think of new ways to frame arguments that would yield more positive outcomes.

 

What we need is new exit strategies for arguments but we’re not going to have new exit strategies for arguments until we have new entry approaches to arguments. We need to think of new kinds of arguments.

 

Put in different terms, what Daniel Cohen is urging us to do is to shift from a fixed mindset understanding of arguments to a growth mindset appraisal of argumentation. This idea of mindsets comes from Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck’s research, which I was just writing about last week. Dweck’s big idea is that there are two basic mindsets: the fixed mindset, which sees ability as limited and static–you’re either good at something or you’re not–and the growth mindset which views ability as dynamic and changing over time with effort. Which mindset we hold in any given situation has a wide range of implications on the beliefs we carry and the ways in which we behave. For example, if you believe that ability is fixed and does not change over time, your primary focus is going to be proving your ability, proving that you do have it or, at the very least, hiding that you don’t. The fixed mindset leads to a primary framework of judgement–how good am I at something and am I better than others? Meanwhile, if you think that ability can change over time with effort, you’re going to have a framework that is oriented towards growth and you will develop a  deep desire and excitement for learning. The argument-as-war model puts us in a fixed mindset: this is an either-or model in which you are either a winner–you have talent and ability when it comes to arguing– or you don’t and you’re a loser. If we framed argumentation as fertile ground for growth and learning however, we would be able to place ourselves in a growth mindset from the get go and in doing so, redress many of the distorting effects of the argument-as-war metaphor. Our focus would not be on winning but rather on deepening our thinking and understanding, on discovering new perspectives, on pushing ourselves to keep iterating and refining our beliefs and assumptions.

 

If we want to think of new kinds of arguments, what we need to do is think of new kinds of arguers. So try this, think of all the roles that people play in arguments–there’s the proponent and the opponent in an adversarial dialectical argument, there’s the audience in rhetorical arguments, there’s the reasoner in arguments as proofs, all these different roles. Now, can you imagine an argument in which you’re the arguer but you’re also in the audience, watching yourself argue. Can you imagine yourself watching yourself argue, losing the argument and yet, still at the end of the argument, say ” wow, that was a good argument.” Can you do that? […] I think if you can imagine that kind of argument, where the loser says to the winner, “Yeah, that was a good argument”, then you have imagined a good argument. And more than that, I think you’ve imagined a good arguer. An arguer that’s worthy of the kind of arguer you should try to be. 

 

Oh, and one more thing:

 

It takes practice [effort over time–hello, growth mindset] to become a good arguer, in the sense of being able to benefit from losing. 

Educators, Rethink…* Your Assumptions About School To Become More Effective, Engaging & Fulfilled Teachers

One of life’s greatest pleasures, in my opinion, is the discovery of a simple idea that enables you to completely rethink…* and reappraise your understanding of yourself and the world. Not that the actual rethinking…*process is always pleasurable; it has been my experience that change comes with its fair share of growing pains. But once you have put in the hard work, and developed a deep and multilayered understanding of the idea, made it yours and truly changed your perspective to a new, richer and more nuanced vision of yourself and your reality, there is a special type of intense joy that comes from recognizing the extreme power and impact of simple and elegant thoughts. Carol Dweck‘s book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success– How We Can Learn To Fulfill Our Potential, provided me with such an opportunity for deep, assumption-shattering rethinking…* Dweck, who is a psychologist at Stanford University, has focused her research on achievement and success and elaborated a simple yet extremely impactful idea: success and fulfilling, engaging lives are linked to whether we approach our goals and existence with a fixed mindset–the belief that intelligence and personality traits are fixed, which leads to a desire to look effortlessly endowed and a primary framework of judgement for evaluating experience–or with a growth mindset–the belief that intelligence and character can be developed, which leads to a desire to learn and a framework of growth. Mindset, is a veritable treasure trove of powerful rethinking…* prompts and simple actionable advice which I will write about more fully in future posts. But for now, I’d like to share a passage that I came across earlier today which made me want to howl with recognition:

How can growth-mindset teachers be so selfless, devoting untold hours to the worst students? Are they just saints? Is it reasonable to expect that everyone can become a saint? The answer is that they’re not entirely selfless. They love to learn. And teaching is a wonderful way to learn. About people and how they tick. About what you teach. About yourself. And about life.

Fixed-mindset teachers often think of themselves as finished products. Their role is simply to impart their knowledge. But doesn’t that get boring year after year? Standing before yet another crowd of faces and imparting. Now, that’s hard.

Seymour Sarason was a professor of mine when I was in graduate school. He was a wonderful educator, and he always told us to question assumptions. “There’s an assumption,” he said, “that schools are for students’ learning. Well, why aren’t they just as much for teachers’ learning?”  I never forgot that. In all of my teaching, I think about what I find fascinating and what I would love to learn more about. I use my teaching to grow, and that makes me, even after all these years, a fresh and eager teacher.

Source: Dweck, Carol. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success – How We Can Learn To Fulfill Our Potential. New York: Ballantine Books, 2008. Print.

This is exactly what rethinked…* is about–we are an autonomous, innovation team whose mission is to help students and teachers question their assumptions and rethink…* their practices to optimize their learning and teaching and experience more fluid, nourishing, and engaging lives. We’ve worked with IDEO to explore the ways in which design thinking could be applied to K12 to optimize the learning and teaching experiences. We’ve worked with the Rotman School of Management to see how integrative thinking could be leveraged in rethinking…* education. We’ve partnered with Martin Seligman and Angela Duckworth to integrate principles of positive psychology into the curriculum to teach character strengths such as grit and gratitude. But at the end of the day, all of these methods are just tools that we employ to rethink…* our doing and, just as importantly, iterate our questioning. Tools are lifeless, their impact comes from the purpose for which they are used and from the people who use them. And people are complex, multilayered beings ruled by their assumptions. By using different tools we broaden our field of inquiry, we try on new perspectives from which to evaluate our assumptions and in the process, we continue to refine our questions about what it means to thrive in our lives and learning. How? is a very important question–without it, nothing would get done, ideas would remain intangible, non actionable and therefore unimpactful. But why? must come first and it must infuse the process of iterating the how?

Ultimately, we’re not looking for definitive, all encompassing answers. Rather, we aim to keep moving towards more salient iterations of the age old question: what is the good life for man and how do we get there? And through our evolving questioning, to discover simple, impactful hacks such as the one proposed by Dr. Sarason– reframing how we approach teaching by questioning assumptions about school and rethinking…* their purpose with a simple question–to empower as many people as we can to take control of their experiences and learning and enjoy fluid, playful and fulfilling lives.

Check out Joy’s post, What Do We Assume About School and Learning? and try to see how many different ways you can rethink…* the assumptions he’s collected.

Developing Thoughtfulness in 5K: E-portfolio archiving and Self-Assessment

“A link to the design of core academic experience becomes clear: any genuine learning has to involve perspective on what is learned, not an authoritative march through Official Knowledge[…]”-Grant Wiggins


The rethinkED team started off this fall working with a 5th Grade teacher at Riverdale Country Day School. The driving question behind the project is: can alternative portfolio assessment, namely e-portfolios, be used to more effectively assess students and to increase students’ capacity for critical thinking and self-evaluation?

From there, we developed the questions: How can students become active participants in their own learning and assessment? How can students develop the communication skills and metacognitive practices necessary not only for assessing themselves but also for communicating that assessment to others?

Developing Thoughtfulness in the 5th grade seeks to draw the line between self-critical vs. self-congratulatory analysis by developing an appreciation of the process and an understanding of what “good” means. This involves finding ways to make students comfortable with their own shortcomings and successes. That is, this project aims to give students permission to fail and creative confidence in designing their own educational futures through portfolios.

Many students feel they are engaged in a “race to nowhere,” to use the title of the widely acclaimed movie. Students are trained to seek the approval of teachers without learning the critical thinking skills to evaluate their own work and dialogue with their peers about their work. Research has begun to show that portfolio evaluation, especially beginning at an earlier age, is an excellent way for students to learn critical thinking, argumentation, and dialogue skills to assess their own work, the work of their peers, and their own learning in a broader sense.

This rethinkED project will influence the ways students and teachers think about the work produced in school and at home, about grades and student report cards, and most importantly, about the educational goals of RCS and the kind of thinker the school is trying to develop.

Working with one 5th grade teacher at RCS, the rethinkED team interviewed, brainstormed ideas, and developed a proposal that included step-by-step instructions for setting up a Google site for e-portfolioing until we can find an ideal e-portfolio platform (a project another team at the school is working on). After further interviews, readings, and conversations, it became evident that even before students could fully engage in the process of e-portfolioing, they needed to become engaged in learning about their own learning.

In order to hold student-led parent-teacher conferences and have students reflect intelligently about their own work in light of shared sense of a standard, it became evident we had to take a few steps back and engage students more in critical thinking about their own work.

Inspired by Grant Wiggin’s piece “thinking about thinking” and the Visible Learning work coming out of Harvard’s project Zero, the rethinkED team worked with the the 5th grade teacher to develop a menu of strategies for creating habit, language, mindsets, and character traits for portfolio-archiving work.

Sample of ideas from our Menu of Strategies:

1. Outward Bound/ Experiential Ed Games

  • Use games to begin to develop a metacognitive sense of the learning that is happening.
  • Have student begin to be aware of the character traits they are using in their learning processes.

2. Have a workshop where students think about how they learn
ideas:

  • Have conversations about homework.
  • Run a reflective portfolio hour–maybe as a group analyze a shared piece of work?

3. Interview students to develop rubric

  • How do you know something is good?
  • What standards do you set for yourself?

Depending on the assignments, some could use a rubric and others have reflection and critical thinking as part of the work. A generic rubric that could be applied to all assignments could be similar to the Visual Thinking Strategies three questions:

  • What’s going on in this picture?
  • What do you see that makes you say that?
  • What more can we find?

4. Culture and Conversation of Archiving

  • What did I learn today?–daily blog entry

5. Using Google Docs
5th grade students can look at their own revision history using Google doc.

  • Self-control mindset example: How early did you start the assignment? Did you start it the night before or a week before? This kind of decision making is reflective and involves self-control.  Helps avoid a student being pushed to plagiarize.
  • Alleviate the concern of “getting it right” the first time. Learn through experience that its okay not to get spelling right the first time. Possible to go back during editing process and correct spelling.

The next step of the project for the rethinkED team will be to observe students, interview and begin to conduct workshops in class. Stay tuned for more!

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