Tag artists

{ Chance Meetings } Celebrating Lautréaumont’s Birthday & the Spaces Between Things & Ideas…*

“As beautiful as the chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table.”
– Comte de Lautréamont

Today is Isidore-Lucien Ducasse, aka Comte de Lautréamont’s birthday. Lautréaumont is best known for his splendid story, The Songs of Maldoror, which was a major influence on the Surrealists. The quote above, which comes from The Songs of Maldoror has deeply shaped my sense of aesthetics. I often write about the immense potential for rethinking …* that connecting different ideas and disciplines can produce. In honor of Lautréaumont’s birthday I have compiled a little collection of projects and ideas, which I feel reflect this desire to translate, connect and blur ideas, mediums and spaces to produce something new, fresh and bursting with questions and possibilities. As I was trying to put this post together, I realized that I had lots of projects that I would love to include so I’ve decided to make Lautréaumont’s birthday a week-long celebration here on rethinked* Today, you will find a little selection of projects that cut across all boundaries and medium. On Tuesday I will share some cool “Music Machines” and on Thursday “Drawing Machines.” I hope you will find these projects and artists as fascinating and inspiring as I have. And please share with me your favorite “chance meetings.”

Delight, blur & rethink …* 

– Geese, Myth & Astronomy –

{ The Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility (MGA) Agnes Meyer-Brandis } Agnes Meyer Brandis’ poetic-scientific investigations weave fact, imagination, storytelling and myth, past, present and future. In “THE MOON GOOSE ANALOGUE: Lunar Migration Bird Facility (MGA)” the artist develops a narrative based on Godwin’s The Man in the Moone, in which the protagonist flies to the Moon in a chariot towed by ‘moon geese’. Meyer-Brandis has actualised this concept by raising eleven moon geese with astronauts’ names and imprinting them on herself as goose-mother. They live in a remote Moon analogue operated from a control room within the gallery.

THE MOON GOOSE ANALOGUE – documentation from Agnes Meyer-Brandis on Vimeo.

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– Graffiti & Stop Motion –

{ BIG BANG BIG BOOMBLU }

An unscientific point of view on the beginning and evolution of life … and how it could probably end.

BIG BANG BIG BOOM – the new wall-painted animation by BLU from blu on Vimeo.

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– Garbage trucks & Cameras – 

{ Trashcam Project – Christoph Blaschke, Mirko Derpmann, Scholz & Friends Berlin and the Hamburg sanitation department }

Hamburg´s garbagemen portrait their city in the Trashcam Project – with their garbage containers. Standard 1.100 litre containers are transformed to giant pinhole cameras. With these cameras the binmen take pictures of their favourite places to show the beauty and the changes of the city they keep clean every day.

The Trashcam Project was developed by Christoph Blaschke, Mirko Derpmann, Scholz & Friends Berlin and the Hamburg sanitation department. Special thanks to Hamburg based photographer Matthias Hewing (www.matthiashewing.de/) for his professional advice and the challenging lab work with the giant negatives.

Trashcam Project

The fun fair “Dom” in Hamburg photographed with a garbage container by
garbageman Bernd Leguttky, Christoph Blaschke and Mirko Derpmann. Shot on a 106×80 cm sheet of ilford multigrade with ten minutes exposure time.

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– Tattoos & Music – 

Reading My BodyDmitry Morozovа sound controller that uses tattoo as a music score – this is a special instrument that combines human body and robotic system into a single entity that is designed to automate creative process in an attempt to represent the artist and his instrument as a creative hybrid.

::vtol:: “reading my body” from ::vtol:: on Vimeo.

 …*

– Scent, machines & Memories –

{ The MadeleineAmy Radcliffe } an analogue odor camera.

Based on current perfumery technology, Headspace Capture, The Madeleine works in much the same way as a 35mm camera. Just as the camera records the light information of a visual in order to create a replica The Madeleine records the chemical information of a smell.

If an analogue, amateur-friendly system of odour capture and synthesis could be developed, we could see a profound change in the way we regard the use and effect of smells in our daily lives. From manipulating our emotional wellbeing through prescribed nostalgia, to the functional use of conditioned scent memory, our olfactory sense could take on a much more conscious role in the way we consume and record the world.

HOW TO SUCCEED WITH YOUR MADELEINE from AMY RADCLIFFE on Vimeo.

[Hat tip: Scentography: the camera that records your favorite smells via The Guardian, published June 28, 2013.]

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– Clothes & Poetry – 

{ Poetry BombingAugustina Woodgate } Clothing labels with poems printed on them are sewn clandestinely in local Thrift Stores. 2011

Places and Objects are alive, we make them alive, they tell our stories and tales. Sewing poems in clothes in a way is giving the garments a voice. We are in relation — with others, with things, with the world. This being-in-relation, is a way of perceiving, a mode of moving, a narrative of global truths designed by cultural fictions. Sewing poems in clothes is a way of bringing poetry to everyday life just by displacing it, by removing it from a paper to integrate it and fuse it with our lives. Sometimes little details are stronger when they are separated from where they are expected to be.

Poetry Bombing With Agustina Woodgate for O, MIAMI, published  April 27, 2011

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– Architecture & Music –

{ Dithyrambalina: The Music Box and Beyond – an experiment to create Musical Architecture }

dith·y·ramb, noun: A chant of wild and abandoned nature sung by the cult of Dionysus to bring forth their god.

A host of international artists, musicians and inventors are creating Dithyrambalina – a landmark village of musical, playable houses. Invented instruments embedded into the walls, ceilings, and floors of Dithyrambalina’s architecture will support boundary-breaking musical performances and inspire wonder, exploration and invention in visitors of all ages. This New Orleans Airlift project is the evolving brainchild of artists Swoon, Delaney Martin, Taylor Lee Shepherd and Jay Pennington in collaboration with over 100 more artists and musicians to date. Last year they debuted THE MUSIC BOX, as a proof-of-concept for their vision.

Dithyrambalina: The Music Box and Beyond from TungstenMonkey on Vimeo.

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– Blood, Resin & LIGHT –

{ Blood & Resin – Jordan EaglesJordan Eagles is a New York based artist who preserves blood to create works that evoke the connections between life, death, body, spirit and the Universe…

Blood, procured from a slaughterhouse, is the primary medium in Eagles’ works. Through his experimental, invented process, he encases blood in plexiglass and UV resin. This preservation technique permanently retains the organic material’s natural colors, patterns, and textures. The works become relics of that which was once living, embodying transformation, regeneration, and an allegory of death to life.

Jordan Eagles – Blood & Resin from Jordan Eagles on Vimeo.

[Hat Tip: Preserved Blood Paintings Seem To Glow From Within via PSFK, published June 18, 2013.]

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– Biology & Architecture –

{ Bloom – Doris Kim Sung } Metal that breathes

Modern buildings with floor-to-ceiling windows give spectacular views, but they require a lot of energy to cool. Doris Kim Sung works with thermo-bimetals, smart materials that act more like human skin, dynamically and responsively, and can shade a room from sun and self-ventilate.

Doris Kim Sung: Metal That Breathes via TED published May 2012

[ Hat Tip: Biologist-Turned-Architect Invents “Breathing” Metal Building Skin via Architizer, published October 30, 2012.]

 …*

– TREES, WIND, CHance & INK –

{ Conversation With Trees – Shih Yun Yeo } a collaboration between artist Yeo Shih Yun and trees across Singapore.

A collection of tree drawings at different intervals over the two months( 01-11-2010 to 31-12-2010) , Conversation with trees is a collaboration between artist Yeo Shih Yun and trees across Singapore. In this exhibition, there is a multi-media presentation of drawings, photographs, silk-screen paintings and video installation.

In this latest series of works, Shih Yun tests the influence of external physical and metaphysical forces- wind and chance on the glorious mark-marking process. At random intervals, she attaches Chinese brushes dipped in Chinese ink to the tips of branches of trees in various settings across Singapore and allows the chance movement of the wind to create the marks. Each brush stroke created by the tree and wind is spontaneous, without the constraints of a limited visual vocabulary, creating drawings of absolute freedom and honesty. The resulting ‘tree drawings’ are then selected and transferred onto silk-screens. The silk-screens are then used by Shih Yun to create abstract paintings on linen of various sizes.

Coversations with trees from shih yun yeo on Vimeo.

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– Robots & Movie Scripts –

{ Do You Love MeCleverbot & Chris Wilson } a movie written by a machine.

Cleverbot.com has been touted as one of the most advanced artificial intelligences ever. The website allows users to chat with the A.I. Cleverbot. But how good is it, really? I sat down with Cleverbot and collaborated on a movie script.

I tried to talk to Cleverbot just like I would with a human writing partner. I set up scenarios and Cleverbot provided all of the dialog content for the scene.

[Hat Tip: Watch A Hilarious Movie Written By A Machine via FastCoDesign, published February 14, 2013.]

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W.H. Auden On Teaching Creative Writing, the Joys Of Constraints & the Transformative Power of Collaboration …*

W.H. Auden On Teaching Creative Writing, the Joys Of Constraints & the Transformative Power of Collaboration ...* | rethinked.org

W. H. Auden at the Poetry Center, 1966. Photo: Diane Dorr-Dorynek, courtesy of 92Y Unterberg Poetry Center via The Paris Review

 

W.H. Auden, whose birthday is today, had some marvelous views on the impossibility of teaching creative writing, the productive joys of constraints and the transformative power of collaboration, all topics dear to our hearts here at rethinked * I particularly love his views on teaching creative writing by exploring a wide range of other disciplines– creativity, after all, is often found in the in-between, cross-over spaces. Also, apprenticeships!

 TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING TRANSDISCIPLINARILY & THROUGH AN  APPRENTICE SYSTEM

If I had to “teach poetry,” which, thank God, I don’t, I would concentrate on prosody, rhetoric, philology, and learning poems by heart. I may be quite wrong, but I don’t see what can be learned except purely technical things—what a sonnet is, something about prosody. If you did have a poetic academy, the subjects should be quite different—natural history, history, theology, all kinds of other things. When I’ve been at colleges, I’ve always insisted on giving ordinary academic courses—on the eighteenth century, or Romanticism. True, it’s wonderful what the colleges have done as patrons of the artists. But the artists should agree not to have anything to do with contemporary literature. If they take academic positions, they should do academic work, and the further they get away from the kind of thing that directly affects what they’re writing, the better. They should teach the eighteenth century or something that won’t interfere with their work and yet earn them a living. To teach creative writing—I think that’s dangerous. The only possibility I can conceive of is an apprentice system like those they had in the Renaissance—where a poet who was very busy got students to finish his poems for him. Then you’d really be teaching, and you’d be responsible, of course, since the results would go out under the poet’s name.

THE PRODUCTIVE JOYS OF CONSTRAINTS 

But I can’t understand—strictly from a hedonistic point of view—how one can enjoy writing with no form at all. If one plays a game, one needs rules, otherwise there is no fun. The wildest poem has to have a firm basis in common sense, and this, I think, is the advantage of formal verse. Aside from the obvious corrective advantages, formal verse frees one from the fetters of one’s ego. Here I like to quote Valéry, who said a person is a poet if his imagination is stimulated by the difficulties inherent in his art and not if his imagination is dulled by them.

THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF COLLABORATION

I’ve always enjoyed collaborating very much. It’s exciting. Of course, you can’t collaborate on a particular poem. You can collaborate on a translation, or a libretto, or a drama, and I like working that way, though you can only do it with people whose basic ideas you share—each can then sort of excite the other. When a collaboration works, the two people concerned become a third person, who is different from either of them in isolation. I have observed that when critics attempt to say who wrote what they often get it wrong. Of course, any performed work is bound to be a collaboration, anyway, because you’re going to have performers and producers and God knows what.

Source: W.H. Auden, The Art of Poetry No. 17 via The Paris Review, published Spring 1974.

Friday Link Fest…*

READ

Naoto Fukasawa & Jane Fulton Suri on Smartphones as Social Cues, Soup as a Metaphor for Design, the Downside of 3D Printing and More ~ As keen observers of the world at large and the man-made objects and obstacles we encounter on a regular basis, designer Naoto Fukasawa and IDEO’s Jane Fulton Suri, who served on the jury for last year’s Braunprize selections, had plenty of interesting things to say about the current state of design and just what it means to be ‘normal’. via Core77, published June 17, 2013.

Ask Great Questions: Leadership Skills of Socrates ~ Socrates holds the key to an essential leadership skill: asking great questions. The challenge is that too few leaders, managers and employees ask great questions. This is a big problem. Cultures that embrace a culture of questioning thrive and those that fear it either fail or are doomed to mediocrity. Here are 7 basics ingredients to nurture this Socratic culture. via Forbes, published June 18, 2013.

The Bossless Office Trend ~ A nonhierarchical workplace may just be a more creative and happier one. “Management is a term to me that feels very twentieth century,” says Simon Anderson, the CEO of the web-hosting company DreamHost, “That 100-year chunk of time when the world was very industrialized, and a company would make something that could be stamped out 10 million times and figured out a way to ship it easily, you needed the hierarchy for that. I think this century is more about building intelligent teams.” via New York Magazine, published June 16, 2013.

The Worry That You’re Doing The Wrong Thing Right Now ~ You begin one task from an email, but then quickly have the urge to see if there’s something else more important you should be doing. And this problem repeats itself—every time you sit down with one thing, the dozens of others on your mind (and the many potential urgent items that might be coming in as you sit there) are grasping for your attention. Is there ever any certainty that you’re doing the right thing right now? via Design Taxi, published June 17, 2013.

50 Problems in 50 Days:  A Cross-Continent Design Adventure ~ Peter Smart recently travelled 2,517 miles to try and solve 50 Problems in 50 Days using design. This journey took him from the bustling streets of London to the cobbled lanes of Turin to test design’s ability to solve social problems—big and small. via GOOD, published June 18, 2013.

England’s ‘Play Streets’ Initiative Shuts Down Streets so Kids are Free to Play in their Neighborhood ~ via Inhabitots, published June 17, 2013.

The Best Thing We Could Do About Inequality Is Universal Preschool ~ The latest research, from a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper by James Heckman and Lakshmi Raut, concludes that a policy of free preschool for all poor children would have a raft of cost-effective benefits for society and the economy: It would increase social mobility, reduce income inequality, raise college graduation rates, improve criminal behavior (saving some of the societal expenses associated with it), and yield higher tax revenue thanks to an increase in lifetime wages. via The Atlantic, published June 17, 2013.

When Catastrophe Strikes, Emulate the Octopus ~ Nature teaches us that adaptation to environmental risk carries no goal of perfection. In human society, it’s politically expedient to propose top- down security initiatives that promise total risk elimination, such as “winning the global war on terror.” But trying to eliminate a threat like terrorism is like trying to eliminate predation, and trying to minimize it with a single, centralized plan is the direct opposite of adaptability. Well-adapted organisms do not try to eliminate risk—they learn to live with it. via Wired, published March 21, 2012.

LOOK

12 Amazing Miniature Replicas Of Famous Artists’ Studios ~ Joe Fig visits famous artists in their studios, asking questions, shooting photographs, and taking meticulous measurements. Then he creates these incredibly accurate dioramas. via FastCoDesign, published June 12, 2013.

Students Transform a Parking Spot In Front of Their School Into a Cool Parklet ~ As a technology teacher at Jericho Middle School in Long Island, New York, Matthew Silva is constantly looking for ways to infuse design thinking and process into his curriculum. With this goal in mind, he recently challenged his students to solve a problem for their school. Their challenge was to design a parklet for a parking space in front of the school where students wait every day for their parents to pick them up. via Inhabitat, published June 17, 2013.

This Is What Our Grocery Shelves Would Look Like Without Bees ~ A Whole Foods store in Rhode Island made it crystal clear to customers how their favorite fruits and vegetables depend on bees. via FastCoDesign, published June 20, 2013.

Play Perch / Syracuse University ~ architecture, play, exploration & early childhood development. via ArchDaily, published June 18, 2013.

Beautiful Pics Of Trash, Inspired By Botanical Drawings ~ Barry Rosenthal‘s series of jewel-toned garbage collections, ‘Found in Nature‘, sheds new light on litter. via FastCoDesign, published June 12, 2013.

WATCH

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation ~ Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation is a five-week course that will introduce you to the concepts of human-centered design and help you use the design process to create innovative, effective, and sustainable solutions for social change. No prior design experience necessary. Brought to you by Acumen & IDEO.org. Register now!

Browser that allows people around the world to surf the internet together in one window ~ What if you and your friends (or complete strangers) shared a browser? What sites would you visit and how would you communicate with one another? Swedish artist Jonas Lund explores those questions in his most recent project We See in Every Direction. As part of Rhizome’s online exhibition series The Download, Lund built a browser that allows people around the world to surf the internet together in one window. Users appear as cursors and can click around to different URLs, type messages in search bars or just sit back and observe what’s happening on the web. via Wired, published June 14, 2013.

Introducing Wireless Philosophy: An Open Access Philosophy Project Created by Yale and MIT ~ “Wireless Philosophy,” or Wiphi, is an online project of “open access philosophy” co-created by Yale and MIT that aims to make fundamental philosophical concepts accessible by “making videos that are freely available in a form that is entertaining” to people “with no background in the subject.” via Open Culture, published June 18, 2013.

EYE AM: Teaching Kids in Developing Countries to Tell Their Stories Through Photography ~ Todays media often creates an unfair picture of the lives of kids in developing countries – how they live and who they are. Poverty. No individuality. No creativity. But that’s a picture that isn’t created by those who really know what it looks like. The kids themselves. Together with you, we’ll create a more realistic view of the world. via Petapixel, published June 15, 2013.

School kids convince Crayola to start recycling their pens ~ Last year, members of the Sun Valley Elementary School’  “Green Team”, made up of 1st thru 5th-graders, decided to try to reduce the environmental impact of their creative process — by looking for a way to give those dried-up markers another life outside the landfill. Led by teacher Mr. Land Wilson, the forward-thinking youngsters made an appeal to the manufacturer of their favorite felt-tipped pens, Crayola, to convince the company to start recycling their empties. via Inhabitat, published June 17, 2013.

Friday Link Fest…*

rethinked

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READ

Skipping Out On College And ‘Hacking Your Education ~ #Knowmad via NPR, published March 5, 2013.

Of Artists and Entrepreneurs: The Second Renaissance is Now ~ via Big Think, published March 7, 2013.

The Benefits of Optimism Are Real ~ via The Atlantic, published March 1, 2013.

The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom, Because The World Is Your Class ~ #Knowmad via FastCo.Exist , published March 4, 2013.

What Do You Have in Common with a Low-Income Indian Mother? More Than You Think ~ via GOOD, published March 1, 2013.

Embracing the Shake: Why Limitations Drive Creativity ~ via FastCo.Create, published March 5, 2013

Finding the Just-Right Level of Self-Esteem for a Child ~ via the Wall Street Journal, published February 26, 2013.

How Serious Play Leads To Breakthrough Innovation ~ via FastCo.Design, published March 4, 2013.

 

Friday Link Fest {January 3-11, 2013}

Friday Link Fest {January 3-11, 2013} Photograph by Elsa Fridman

 

The Future of Work  ~ a PSFK Labs Report

John Maeda & The Art of Leadership: Considering Business Leadership as an Artistic Endeavor ~ via Design Matters

“Art is about asking questions, which is a good way of looking at how to solve a problem. I like to apply how artists think to look at how to improve design, technology…and now leadership.” -John Maeda

To Increase Innovation Take the Sting Out of Failure ~ via Harvard Business Review, published January 9, 2013.

Start by defining a smart failure. Everyone in your organization knows what success is. It’s the things you put on a resume: increased revenues, decreased costs, delivered a product etc. Far fewer know what a smart failure is — i.e. the type of failures that should be congratulated. These are the thoughtful and well planned projects that for some reason didn’t work. Define them so people know the acceptable boundaries within which to fail. If you don’t define them, all failure looks risky and it will kill creativity and innovation.

Questions to consider in defining smart failures: What makes a failure smart in our organization? What makes a failure dumb? Specifically, what guidelines, approaches, or processes characterize smart risk taking? What clear examples can we point to, to demonstrate smart failures? You want people to clearly understand the right and wrong way to fail.

Bike Spikes Allow For Urban Rides In The Snow ~ For his graduation project at the Design Academy Eindhoven, Dutch designer Cesar van Rongen developed an ingenious solution for the two-wheeled set to use during the oh-so- cold-and-slippery season. via FastCoDesign, published January 10, 2013.

What Innovators Can Learn From Artists ~ via Design Mind, published January 2, 2013.

1. Artists are “neophiles”
2. Artists are humanists
3. Artists are craftspeople
4. Artists are like children
5. Artists rely on their intuition
6. Artists are comfortable with ambiguity
7. Artists are holistic, interdisciplinary thinkers
8. Artists thrive under constraints
9. Artists are great storytellers
10. Artists are conduits and not “masters of the universe”
11. Artists are passionate about their work
12. Artists are contrarians

Steelcase’s Anthropologist On Remaking Offices To Create Happier Workers ~ The need to text is new, while the needs to make contact–and to find privacy–are old. Same old human nature thrown into constantly new contexts. It’s the job of Donna Flynn, who directs Steelcase’s WorkSpace Futures, a 19-member independent research group within the global office design company, to understand how these timely (and timeless) trends shape the way we work. via Fast Company, published January 3, 2013.

The workplace is becoming distributed.
As teams spread out, the nature of collaboration changes.
This quest leads to another: privacy
At the core of all this is well-being.

21 Emotions For Which There Are No English Words ~ Infographic by design student Pei-Ying Lin. via Pop Sci, published January 4, 2013.

How to design breakthrough inventions60 Minutes‘ profile of David Kelley and IDEO: Global firm IDEO incorporates human behavior into product design — an innovative approach being taught at Stanford. Charlie Rose profiles the company’s founder, David Kelley. via 60 Minutes, Published January 6, 2013.

 

Jun Fujiwara’s Re: Sound Bottle Remixes The Sounds All Around You ~ via FastCoDesign, published January 9, 2013.

(Re: Sound Bottle from Jun Fujiwara on Vimeo.)

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