Tag Twitter

{ 2 Visual Rethinking Prompts } How Might We Empower More Young Female Voices & Create More Meaningful Assessment Rubrics …*

Here are two powerful images that popped up this month on our Facebook and Twitter feeds respectively. Each highlights a critical opportunity to rethink, which I hope will inspire you to iterate some ideas and solutions of your own.

question, empower & rethink …

{ 2 Visual Rethinking Prompts } How Might We Empower More Young Female Voices & Create More Meaningful Assessment Rubrics ...* | rethinked.org

Screen Shot of Get Lit’s Facebook Page

 

{ 2 Visual Rethinking Prompts } How Might We Empower More Young Female Voices & Create More Meaningful Assessment Rubrics ...* | rethinked.org

Screen Shot of a Tweet from Brad Ovenell-Carter

 

 

Friday Link Fest…*

READ

A creative future for education ~ Tim Brown on the essential role of creativity in education. via World Economic Forum, published February 6, 2013

Learning From Failure ~ via The New York Times, published February 1, 2013

Adaptive Innovation: Create, Learn, Repeat ~ via Change Observer, published February 6, 2013

Think Deep, Work Lean: Blending design thinking with lean start-startup methods ~ via PSFK, published February 3, 2013

Why Innovators Love Constraints ~ via Harvard Business Review, published February 4, 2013

You Are Therefore I Am: How Empathy Education Can Create Social Change ~ via Oxfam, published July 2008

How Mark Changizi conquered colorblindness with glasses ~ via io9, published February 6, 2013

LOOK

The World’s Tweets Light Up the Globe in Stunning Live Visualization ~ Tweetping by Franck Ernewein. via Wired Design, published February 2, 2013

The Year’s Most Outstanding Science Visualizations ~ via Smithsonian Magazine, published February 5, 2013

Kids Collaborate to Create Awesome Spaceships ~ via JunkCulture, published February 1, 2013

WATCH

Barry Schwartz on Our Loss of Wisdom ~ via TED-Ed, published February 2, 2013

A Delightful Surprise Light Performance At New York’s Grand Central Station via Design Taxi, published February 6, 2013

Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere ~ via io9, published February 5, 2013

Synchronized Porta-Potties Create Music When In Use ~ via PSFK, published February 7, 2013

Twitter, Functional Fixedness, and MacGyver

In December 2009 I swore off social media. In a blaze of quasi-Luddite glory I defriended all my Facebook friends, untagged every photo, deleted all my information, and deactivated my account. I didn’t just leave–I left nothing to return to. I was free from Facebook, and my achievement was met with approving nods and impressed gasps of disbelief from family and friends who just couldn’t pull the plugs on their own accounts, even if they really wanted to.

Facebook was the only social media I had been on at the time. I knew of Twitter, but I’d never used it. I knew that people used it to give AIM-esque status updates–boring sentences describing the basic events of their day. I dismissed Twitter as frivolous, and I continued to stay off social media for about three years afterwards.

Last June I opened a Twitter account (@jshurd4). I’m not sure exactly why, but I think that joining the rethinkED team was the main motivator. I started by following the same people that @rethinkedteam was following, and eventually began thinking of others to follow. Friends, companies, and figures who I thought might guide me to great articles. Today, I find the best articles I read by looking on Twitter. I’ll read anything that education writer Daniel Willingham (@DTWillingham) posts, anything that Annie Murphy Paul (@anniemurphypaul) writes, anything that Ezra Klein (@ezraklein) blogs about. Twitter might make me a bit less discerning about some things, but it’s certainly made me better informed about education, politics, and lots of other stuff going on around the world.

But this post isn’t meant to be an encomium of Twitter. I don’t think the service needs my endorsement (I only have 60 followers, after all). My point here is that I had for a long time dismissed Twitter, not because of what it was so much as because of how I thought people used it. I never stopped and asked myself, “What is Twitter? What could it enable me to do?” Instead, I just thought that it was a frivolous way to keep others updated about the minutiae of your daily life. That’s what I’d heard, and that was my judgment.

So often we miss things that are staring us right in the face because we never really look very closely or think very hard about what we encounter. Our expectations cloud our perception, and we develop what psychologists call “functional fixedness.” If we want to see new uses for things and create new ways of seeing the world, we have to look at things for what they are, see the component parts, and not pass a fixed judgment on all the little details we uncover. Tony McCaffrey, of UMass – Amherst, has developed a “generic-parts technique” to help people overcome functional fixedness when solving problems. For example, if we call the string in a candle a “wick,” we are giving it a fixed function. If, however, we see it as “string,” then we might see uses for it that we would otherwise have passed right over. You know one guy who always rose above functional fixedness? MacGyver.

When we’re in a rush to solve a problem, the last thing we might want to do is take extra time to stop, slow down our minds, and take in all the little details one by one. But isn’t that worth it if it helps us reach a better solution? This all goes back to my current interest in uncovering assumptions. There’s always value in asking ourselves what we might be missing. If a solution seems too easy, then it probably is, and there’s probably a better one to be found.

Oh, yeah. And I haven’t gone crawling back to Facebook. At least not yet.

Friday Link Fest {October 19-26, 2012}

ARTICLES

Getting Energy From the Ocean Floor ~ A consortium of companies, including Eaton Corporation, Triton, and others, are in the process of building the first-ever collection system designed to harvest energy from the currents found in the depths of Earth’s oceans. via BigThink, published October 17, 2012.

Twitter Turns #SignsYoSonIsGay Hashtag Into Warm and Fuzzy Support Group ~ On the people of Twitter being awesome and the power of social media to create supportive communities. via Gawker, published October 20, 2012.

Why Focus Groups Kill Innovation, From The Designer Behind Swiffer ~ Design Thinking in action: The Aeron Chair, the Swiffer, and the Reebok Pump–none of these breakthrough products would have gotten high marks from a focus group. Here Continuum’s Gianfranco Zaccai lists four steps to take before introducing a design to the masses. via FastCo.Design, published October 18, 2012.

What Both MBAs And MFAs Get Wrong About Solving Business Problems ~ Numbers and bullet points aren’t the only things driving executive decision making. And pretty pictures won’t get you there either. Both Designers and MBAs have a lot to learn. via FastCo.Design, published April 26, 2012

Urban ExperimentsTake to the Streets~ “a living laboratory” of two dozen imaginative inventions for transforming public space being showcased at the Urban Prototyping Festival, a free, 10-hour event in downtown San Francisco held last Sartuday. via San Francisco Gate, published October 19, 2012.

TALKS

New York Times Data Artist Jer Thorp on Humanized Data at the Intersection of Science, Art and Design ~ In a talk given at TEDxVancouver, Jer Thorp takes us on a sweeping tour of his work and ethos, living at the intersection of science, art, and design. via Brainpickings, published March 1, 2012.

YouTube Announces The Next 10 Gurus Of Education ~ After more than 1,000 entries, YouTube has chosen the next 10 Gurus of Education. The search started last month when YouTube teamed up with Khan Academy to find a few folks who could generate useful content and resources for the YouTube EDU channels (1,000 channels exist so far). via Edudemic, published October 17, 2012.

How Popcorn Maker Adds a New Layer of Information to a TED Talk~ TED goes transmedia: TEDTalk as you have never seen a TEDTalk before — with a clickable layer of information that anyone can add to, edit or remix. via TED Blog, published October 19, 2012

John Maeda on The New Tao of Leadership ~ “when creative people become The Man, it’s quite awkward.” via Big Think, published October October 12, 2012

Education in the Age of Innovation Panel ~ The most significant trend today is the shift away from a world where power is concentrated in the hands of an elite few, and success for everyone else depends on their ability to perform repetitive function work. Instead, in our world now defined by accelerating change, success depends on our individual and collective ability to innovate. During this plenary panel, four of the nation’s premier education thought leaders and practitioners offered their vision for education in the age of innovation. via Ashoka, published Aug 22, 2012.

IMAGES

A Very Unusual Camera That Emphasizes Time Over Space ~ Jay Mark Johnson—an architect, painter, political activist, cinematic special-effects designer, and student of cognitive sciences—probably would not have come up with the idea, himself, were it not for a chance discovery. He had purchased a $85,000 rotating slit-scan camera for high-resolution panoramas. (The camera records vast landscapes sliver by sliver.) Finding the accidental effects of motion in front of the camera strangely poetic, he experimented with stopping the rotation and honing in on one tiny area. These images are the result. via Slate.com, published Oct. 15, 2012.

Temporary Pavilion by Shigeru Ban in Moscow’s Gorky Park ~ On October 20th, 2012 Garage Centre for Contemporary Culture is opening the temporary pavilion by Shigeru Ban, a new venue for exhibitions, lectures, workshops, film screenings, concerts and kids’ activities, with cafe and book store. Ban’s design for the Garage’s new temporary space–situated by Gorky Park’s Pionersky Pond–uses locally produced paper tubes to create an oval wall at 6 meters high with the total area of the pavilion measuring 2,400 square meters. via DesignBoom, published October 20, 2012.

The Must-Have EdTech Cheat Sheet ~ Infographic from Boundless on the whole galaxy of terminology that you should know about when it comes to education technology. via Edudemic, published July 26, 2012.

50 Alternate American Flags, Each A Secret Infographic ~ Rethinking…* the American Flag ~ Design Studio MGMT hides telling data points inside their reimagined variations of the stars and stripes. via FastCoDesign, published October 19, 2012.

Full-Size Museum Replicas from a Makerbot ~ These pieces were printed on a Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printer, by artist Cosmo Wenman, who printed them in several pieces and then assembled them. via BoingBoing.net, published October 20, 2012.

An Inside Look At Art-School Studios Around The World ~ Photographer Leonora Hamill has traveled the world capturing quiet moments at art schools for her Art in Progress series. Creative environments are in clear focus, but it’s chemistry–implicit between teacher and student, materials and limitations, assignment and epiphany–that makes these images so striking and alive. via FastCoDesign, published October 19th, 2012.

The Best Graphics That Make You Realize You Don’t Know How Big Anything Actually Is~ Admit it. You have no real feeling for the size of the solar system. That’s O.K. Nobody else does either. Even knowing the numbers doesn’t help much. If I tell you the Earth is about 8,000 miles in diameter and 93,000,000 miles from the Sun, does that give you any sense of the distances involved? No, because the numbers are too big. Things that are so far removed from our daily experience — like quarks, and dinosaurs, and Kim Kardashian — are inherently hard to understand. via Smithsonian.com, published October 22, 2012.

RESOURCES

47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself ~ Humans: An Evolving Reference. Via Business Insider War Room, published Nov. 22, 2010.

DIY.org ~ Terrific website for kids & adults: Earn Skills, Become a Maker: Build. Make. Hack. Grow.

27 Ways to Learn Programming Online ~ via The Next Web, published October 21, 2012.

Get a Liberal Arts Education For Free on the Internet ~ Just getting a job in this economy is difficult enough. Getting one with a liberal arts degree is simply masochistic. Don’t spend half a decade and thousands of dollars only to join the rest of the English majors busking in a subway. Instead, educate yourself with these valuable, respectable, and totally free online resources. via Gizmodo, published October 20, 2012.

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