Tag social change

Free Online Courses To Help You Become A More Effective Leader of Change …*

Free Online Courses To Help You Become A More Effective Leader of Change ...* | rethinked.org

Hope everyone is staying warm and safe today. If you’re stuck at home and looking for something to do, how about checking out some great (and free) learning opportunities to acquire and develop your skills and knowledge on change and leadership? There’s a whole host of great courses starting over the next few weeks on +Acumen.

+Acumen is a new initiative started in 2012 with the vision of providing thousands of emerging leaders around the world with the skills and moral imagination they need to become more effective at changing the way the world tackles poverty.  +Acumen makes Acumen’s work in leadership and the insights from our work in the field available to everyone. As of Summer 2014, +Acumen has reached 50,000+ participants from 167 countries through its courses. +Acumen also manages various in-person networks – such as chapters, alumni, and course ambassadors – that allow our broader course community to get more involved in supporting Acumen and each other.

From Adaptive Leadership to Storytelling for Change, +Acumen offers a wide variety of free online courses that focus on moral imagination, operational skills and financial skills to help you become a more effective leader of change.

At Acumen, leadership begins with moral imagination: the humility to see the world as it is, and the audacity to imagine the world as it could be. Combined with operational skills and financial skills, our courses aim to equip emerging change leaders with the tools to change the way the world tackles poverty and build a world based on dignity.

Head over to the website to browse the various learning opportunities on offer.

learn, lead & rethink . . . *

{ Get Lit } Poetry, Creative Confidence, Social Change & Teen Literacy …*

Somewhere in America students are embracing poetry, their creative confidence and unique perspectives to express themselves and call out our need for social change. I had goosebumps when I listened to Belissa Escobedo, Rhiannon McGavin, and Zariya Allen performing their piece – Somewhere in America. These splendid young women are part of a non-profit, Get Lit, which uses the performance of classic and spoken word poetry to increase teen literacy.

Get Lit is dedicated to bringing the power of poetic expression to at risk teens through a standards-based curriculum fusing classic literature and poetry with contemporary Spoken Word performance techniques. Get Lit’s programs are designed to boost literacy, foster cultural understanding, and encourage creative self-expression. By immersing teens in the world of great books (often for the first time), Get Lit equips students for future success in college and the workplace by building concise writing skills and dynamic public speaking abilities and a foundation of self-confidence.

I checked out videos of the other students’ performances and, piece after piece, I discovered passionate, creative and confident young men and women expressing themselves with raw and urgent honesty and insight. We so often hear about how American students are being turned into test-taking drones, incapable of critical thinking and lacking in creativity and confidence. The Get Lit crew seriously challenges these stereotypes. Check out the organization’s website to learn more about their work, enjoy the students’ performances and offer your support.

. . . *

It’s A Good Time To Be A Knowmad…* – Free Course To Learn About Using Human-Centered Design For Social Innovation

{ It's A Good Time To Be A Knowmad ...* } Free Course To Learn About Using Human-Centered Design For Social Innovation | rethinked.org

Exciting new learning opportunity on the horizon: Human-Centered Design For Social Innovation, a free five-week course brought to you by Acumen & Ideo.org. This will be the course’s second run as it was previously offered last summer. Registration opens February 18, 2014.

This free course will get you started using the human-centered design process to create innovative, effective, and sustainable solutions for social change in your community.

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation from IDEO.org on Vimeo.

Other intriguing learning opportunities to check out:

Tina Seelig’s upcoming courseCreativity: Music To My Earsa six week course designed to explore several factors that stimulate creativity in individuals, teams, and organizations. Registration is now open for Creativity: Music To My Ears and the course will begin April 2, 2014.

Dave Levin’s free four-week long MOOC on CourseraTeaching Character and Creating Positive Classrooms, which explores the interconnection between character research, education, and academic rigor. The course began yesterday and features our own Dominic Randolph

learn & rethink …

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation ~ Free 5 Week Course Brought To You By Acumen & IDEO.org

Rethinkers rejoice, here’s a great new learning opportunity brought to you by Acumen and IDEO.org ~ a free five-week online course focusing on Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation.

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation is a five-week course that will introduce you to the concepts of human-centered design and help you use the design process to create innovative, effective, and sustainable solutions for social change. No prior design experience necessary.

Please note that registration for the course ends on July 3rd and that you must register as a team of at least two. Team members must be in the same location as you will need to be able to physically meet for workshops.

Learn more about the course & register here.

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation from IDEO.org on Vimeo.

If anyone in NYC is interested in forming a team for the course, please let me know in the comments section below or send me an email at elsa@rethinked.org.

Friday Link Fest…*

READ

A creative future for education ~ Tim Brown on the essential role of creativity in education. via World Economic Forum, published February 6, 2013

Learning From Failure ~ via The New York Times, published February 1, 2013

Adaptive Innovation: Create, Learn, Repeat ~ via Change Observer, published February 6, 2013

Think Deep, Work Lean: Blending design thinking with lean start-startup methods ~ via PSFK, published February 3, 2013

Why Innovators Love Constraints ~ via Harvard Business Review, published February 4, 2013

You Are Therefore I Am: How Empathy Education Can Create Social Change ~ via Oxfam, published July 2008

How Mark Changizi conquered colorblindness with glasses ~ via io9, published February 6, 2013

LOOK

The World’s Tweets Light Up the Globe in Stunning Live Visualization ~ Tweetping by Franck Ernewein. via Wired Design, published February 2, 2013

The Year’s Most Outstanding Science Visualizations ~ via Smithsonian Magazine, published February 5, 2013

Kids Collaborate to Create Awesome Spaceships ~ via JunkCulture, published February 1, 2013

WATCH

Barry Schwartz on Our Loss of Wisdom ~ via TED-Ed, published February 2, 2013

A Delightful Surprise Light Performance At New York’s Grand Central Station via Design Taxi, published February 6, 2013

Seventh grade girl builds rocket, sends Hello Kitty into the upper atmosphere ~ via io9, published February 5, 2013

Synchronized Porta-Potties Create Music When In Use ~ via PSFK, published February 7, 2013

Rethinking…* what it Means to “Know Thyself” ~ Cognitive Empathy as the Great Art Form of the Age of Outrospection

“I think we need to think about bringing empathy into our every day lives in a very sort of habitual way. Socrates said that the way we live a wise and good life was to know thyself. And we’ve generally thought of that as being about being self-reflective, looking in at ourselves. It’s been about introspection. But I think, in the 21st century, we need to recognize that to know thyself is something that can also be achieved by stepping outside yourself, by discovering other people’s lives. And I think empathy is the way to revolutionize our own philosophies of life, to become more outrospective and to create the revolution of human relationships that I think we so desperately need.”

In this RSA Animate video, philosopher Roman Krznaric urges us to rethink…* our definition of “knowing thyself” by shifting our frame of reference from the 20th century notion of introspection to one of outrospection: “the idea of discovering who you are and what do to with your life by stepping outside yourself, discovering the lives of other people, other civilizations.” Krznaric identifies cognitive empathy–perspective taking, which is about understanding somebody else’s worldview, their beliefs, their fears, the experiences that shape how they look at the world and how they look at themselves–as the great art form of outrospection and the catalyst for revolutions of human relationships. The video walks you through the concept of outrospection while providing ideas on how to develop your own empathic capacity (hint: nurture your curiosity!) and how to live one’s life as a great empathic adventurer. The video is a mere ten minutes long and worth every second, but in case you don’t have time to view it just yet, I’ve transcribed my favorite quotes from it, which should give you a good general idea of what outrsopection is and how it can help us rethink…* and enhace our lives and relationships.

 theRSAorg on YouTube, published December 3, 2012

Instead of the age of introspection, we need to shift to the age of outrospection. And by outrospection I mean the idea of discovering who you are and what do to with your life by stepping outside yourself, discovering the lives of other people, other civilizations. And the ultimate art form for the age of outrospection is empathy.

[…] empathy can be part of the art of living; a philosophy of life. Empathy isn’t just something that expands your moral universe, empathy is something that can make you a more creative thinker, improve your relationships, can create the human bonds that make life worth living. But more than that, empathy is also about social change, radical social change.

A lot of people think of empathy as a sort of nice, soft, fluffy concept. I think it’s anything but that. I think it’s actually quite dangerous because empathy can create revolution. Not one of those old-fashioned revolutions of new states, policy, governments, laws, but something much more viral and dangerous, which is a revolution of human relationships.

Cognitive empathy, which is about perspective taking, about stepping into somebody else’s world—almost like an actor looking through the eyes of their character. It’s about understanding somebody else’s worldview, their beliefs, their fears, the experiences that shape how they look at the world and how they look at themselves.

We make assumptions about people; we have prejudices about people, which block us from seeing their uniqueness, their individuality. We use labels and highly empathic people get beyond that, or get beyond those labels, by nurturing their curiosity about others.

Highly empathic people tend to be very sensitive listeners; they’re very good at understanding what somebody else’s need are. They tend to also be people who, in conversation, share parts of their own lives, make conversations two-way dialogues, make themselves vulnerable.

Now, we normally think of empathy as something that happens between individuals. But I also believe it can be a collective force, it can happen on a mass scale. When I think of history, I think not of the rise and fall of civilizations and religions or political systems; I think of the rise and fall of empathy: moments of mass empathic flowering and also, of course, of empathic collapse.

I think we need new social institutions, we need, for example, empathy museums—a place, which is not about dusty exhibits, not like and old Victorian museum, but an experiential and conversational public space where you might walk in and in the first room there is a human library, where you can borrow people for conversations. You walk into the next room and there are twenty sewing machines and there are former Vietnamese sweatshop workers there who will teach you how to make a T-shirt, like the one you’re probably wearing, under sweatshop labor conditions and you’ll be paid five pence at the end of it so you understand the labor behind the label. You may well go into the café and scan in your food and discover the working conditions of those who picked the coffee beans in the drink that you’re drinking. You may see a video of them talking about their lives, trying to make a connection across time and space into realms that you don’t know about.

Friday Link Fest…*

Friday Link Fest...* (January 18-25, 2013}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Firearm Disposal: Designed by Luis Prado, adapted from NPS trash symbol, from The Noun Project

READ

How to Have a Year that Matters ~ Why are you here? Do you want this to be another year that flies by, half-hearted, arid, rootless, barely remembered, dull with dim glimpses of what might have been? Or do you want this to be a year that you savor, for the rest of your surprisingly short time on Planet Earth, as the year you started, finally, irreversibly, uncompromisingly, to explosively unfurl a life that felt fully worth living? The choice is yours. And it always has been. via Harvard Business Review, published January 22, 2013.

Study Shows How Classroom Design Affects Student Learning ~ New study shows how color, lighting, and other classroom design choices can have a huge impact on student progress. via FastCoDesign, published January 18, 2013.

Why All High School Courses Should Be Elective ~ Very few of us could pass the subject matter tests we once took, or would agree that being unable to do so significantly handicaps us. How can we ignore the implications of that fact? Marion Brady asks what’s worth teaching and what’s worth learning to rethink student disengagement and institutional inefficiency. via The Washington Post, published January 22, 2012.

Bio Design In The Home: The Beauty of Bacteria “Bio Design” focuses on the growing movement to integrate organic processes in the creation of buildings and household objects so that resources are conserved and waste is limited. via The New York Times, published January 16, 2013.

The Rhythms of Work vs The Rhythms of Creative Labor ~ Work is what we do by the hour. It begins and, if possible, we do it for money. Welding car bodies on an assembly line is work; washing dishes, computing taxes, walking the rounds in a psychiatric ward, picking asparagus–these are work. Labor, on the other hand, sets its own pace. We may get paid for it, but it’s harder to quantify… Writing a poem, raising a child, developing a new calculus, resolving a neurosis, invention in all forms — these are labors.  via 99u.

The First Rule of Brainstorming: Suspend Disbelief ~ interview with Kon Leong, co-founder, president and chief executive of ZL Technologies, an e-mail and file archiving company. via The New York Times, published January 19, 2013.

Collaboration Across Borders Through Artist Workshops ~ Triangle is a decentralized global network of artists and arts organizations that recently celebrated its thirty-year anniversary. It was founded by artists and continues to be run largely by them. Its objective from the beginning was to connect artists across borders in order to challenge their regular studio practices, engage them in their processes, and foster an intense dialogue about why they’re doing what they’re all doing in their corners of the world. via Hyperallergic, published January 22, 2013.

LOOK

Wicker-Covered Car By Ojo Obaniyi ~ ‘I wanted to prove a point that it is not only the educated elite that can make positive changes in society. We, the artisans also have talents to effect change and make a positive impact in the society.’  via Design Boom, published January 18, 2013

Space Blogger: Chris Hadfield’s Photos from the ISS ~ Colonel Chris Hadfield is  blogging from perhaps the most exclusive place around: the International Space Station (ISS). Hadfield’s Tumblr and Twitter accounts have been very active lately as he treats us with a large selection of photography from his many orbits around the earth. Often shooting from the space station’s famous cupola, he has been getting fantastically beautiful – almost painterly – images of our precious earth. via Visual News, published January 21, 2013.

Korean Students Speak Their Mind Through Written Signs ~ ‘STOP printing out students as if they’re ROBOTS. Let them be humane’ ~ Korean Students Speak tumblr. via My Modern Met, published January 18, 2013

WATCH

TEDxTalks Roundup: 4 Fascinating Talks on Education ~ four talks examining advancements in education: Preventing forgetfulness after the test: Jamshed Bharucha at TEDxCooperUnion; Where is the research and development in education? Jim Shelton at TEDxMidAtlantic; The impact of desegregation on learning: Rucker Johnson at TEDxMiamiUniversity; An end to age-grouping in the classroom: Mary Esselman at TEDxSarasota. via TEDx

Printing 3D Buildings: Five tenets of a new kind of architecture / Neri Oxman ~ 1. Growth over Assembly; 2. Integration over Segregation; 3. Heterogeneity over Homogeneity; 4. Difference over Repetition; 5. Material is the New Software. via Archdaily, published January 18, 2013.

Big Hugging ~ Giant Bear Hugging Video Game ~ Big Huggin’ is a game played with a 30 inch custom teddy bear controller. Players complete the game by providing several well-timed hugs. It is an experiment and gesture in alternative interface. Instead of firing toy guns at countless enemies or revving the engines of countless gas guzzling virtual cars, why not give a hug? A hug is simple gesture. It is one of the first physical expressions of affections a child learns. It is a gesture for the familial through the romantic. It is a gesture of mutual benefit. The game is designed to offer reflection on the way we play and cultural benefits of alternative play. via Kickstarter.

This Airplane’s Been Repurposed Into a Classroom ~ Creating a “kindergarten where the children would not want to go home.” via GOOD, published December 5, 2012

Friday Link Fest {January 11-18, 2013}

Friday Link Fest {January 11-18, 2013} photograph by Elsa Fridman

 

ARTICLES

The 11 Most Generous Designers ~ This is an innovative group (co-curated by Ric Grefé, the executive director of AIGA) who are using design to make the world a better place. Whether creating a compelling graphic to raise money or developing a cause awareness campaign or producing a never-before-seen-product that improves an infant’s livelihood, these creative thinkers are impacting our society in ways that are hard to forget. via FastCo.Exist, published January 14, 2013.

Must-read report on maker-driven education ~ This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement. This model is based on evidence that the most resilient, adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition. via Boing Boing, published January 16, 2013.

How Are You Using the Collective Action Toolkit? ~ The toolkit is being deployed far more broadly than expected, such as in our new Chinese language edition. People are finding new uses for it, from local education to entrepreneurship in global organizations. And we’ve embarked on our first educational pilot, working with SCAD’s Design for Sustainability program. How did this happen? And in what ways can you use the CAT that you may not have considered? via Frog Design, published January 14, 2013.

Innovation Pessimism: Has the ideas machine broken down? ~ The idea that innovation and new technology have stopped driving growth is getting increasing attention. But it is not well founded. via The Economist, published January 12, 2013.

Should 3-Year-Olds Learn Computer Programming? ~ Can 3-year-olds learn enough computer programming to be able to build their own games or animate a story? That’s the theory behind Scratch Jr, an MIT project set to launch this summer that wants to teach preschoolers creativity, design thinking, and problem-solving through coding. via GOOD, published February 27, 2012.

Sitting Is the Smoking of Our Generation ~And ‘walking meetings’ are the antidote. via Harvard Business Review, published January 14, 2013.

Ideo’s Albert Lee On Innovating Ideas ~ Creativity is only the beginning. Here are proven ways to find, filter, and shape the best thinking–whether it’s yours, your team’s, or your customers’. via Fast Company, published January 15, 2013.

IMAGES

Allen Ginsberg’s Hand-Annotated Photos of the Beat Generation ~ Beginning January 15, New Yorkers can visit NYU’s Grey Art Gallery‘s Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg to peruse a selection of 110 photos taken (and often captioned by hand) by none other than Allen Ginsberg. From a shot of Jack Kerouac’s muse, Neal Cassady, and “his love of the year” snuggling under a cinema marquee advertising a Brando triple feature to a solemn photo of William S. Burroughs at the Met, the annotated images provide a personal, visual scrapbook of Ginsberg’s life in the 1950s and beyond. via Flavorwire, published January 11, 2013

How To Be A Minimalist, In Design & In Life ~ Comic artist behind Incidental Comics, Grant Snider produces amusing and surprisingly insightful comics on his blog and for many websites across the internet. via Design Taxi, published January 16, 2013.

Complex Natural Spider Webs Preserved on Glass Plates ~ Artist Emil Fiore, also known as Rocky, collects whole spider webs and preserves the natural works of art behind glass. Based in New Jersey, Fiore first learned about catching a web in a children’s craft book and, ever since, the idea has stuck. In his 20’s, he finally started experimenting with web collection. He has used all kinds of sprays and varnishes to master the preservation of each web in its entirety and his hard work has certainly paid off. Spray painted with silver paint and set behind glass, these striking, silky designs are unique and captivating representations of the wonders of nature. via My Modern Met, published January 12, 2013.

Kumbh Mela: The Largest Gathering on Earth ~ Tens of millions of Hindu pilgrims are now descending on Allahabad, India, joining an estimated 8 million already there for the Maha Kumbh Mela. Held every 12 years at one of four places in India, the Kumbh Mela lasts nearly two months and is considered to be an especially auspicious time to bathe in the holy river for purification from sin. via The Atlantic, published January 14, 2013.

World Design Guide ~ World Design Guide is the first ever online guide to the best international architecture and design events. Created and curated by Dezeen, the guide offers a quick way of finding out when and where key fairs, conferences and festivals take place. The first edition of World Design Guide lists events taking place in 2013. In the future we’ll be adding more layers of information and updating our listings.

VIDEOS

Susan Cain’s breakthrough research on introversion has been turned into another live animation video series. via The Lavin Agency.

(dwlFilms on YouTube, published November 27, 2012)

 

‘In the future, design thinking is going to be called emotionalism’ ~ Roger Arquer ~ via Dezeen, published January 14, 2013.

(Roger Arquer at Designed in Hackney Day from Dezeen on Vimeo.)

Concept Turns Video Gaming Into Full-Body Exercise ~ Intellect Motion has introduced the ‘GameCube’, which makes players get physical during video games. via PSFK, published January 15, 2013.

(Alexander Khromenkov on YouTube, published January 1, 2013)

%d bloggers like this: