Tag creative thinking

What At Your Age Is Called Fantasy & Imagination Is Called Creative Thinking Later On, Don’t Lose It …*

What At Your Age Is Called Fantasy & Imagination Is Called Creative Thinking Later On, Don't Lose It ...*  | rethinked.org

In the past few months, there has been much focus in education circles on the issue of creative confidence. There seems to be a general consensus that the ways in which mainstream traditional education processes and systems are set up strip students of their natural capacity for creative thinking by undermining their creative confidence. Core77 is running an ongoing series with Moa Dickmark, an architect and designer, on working with kids. I was particularly grateful to read Dickmark’s advice to remind students to hold on to their natural capacity for fantasy and imagination as it is a skill that they will need for the rest of their lives. While it is important to find ways to ‘rehabilitate’ those who have been robbed of their natural creative capacity and confidence, we may save future generations a lot of time and unlearning, if we warn kids to hold on to their natural abilities, no matter what demands the system puts on them.

Another thing that is good to think about is to tell the students when you start working with them that:

There’s no right or wrong! If you want to write down your idea, write, we don’t care about the spelling, or grammar for that matter. If you want to draw down your idea, draw. If you want to build your idea, we are going to do that too! 

AND:

What at your age is called Fantasy and Imagination is called Creative Thinking later on, and is something older people go to university to learn more about. So don’t lose it, you will need it now and for the rest of your life! 

Source: Co-Creative Processes In Education: The Small Things That Make A Big Difference, via Core77, published March 10, 2014.

Tim Brown On Nurturing Your Creative Capacity Through Relaxed Attention …*

IDEO‘s Tim Brown has just published a great post over on LinkedIn about the importance of relaxed attention to creative problem-solving :

During relaxed attention, a problem or challenge is taking up space in your brain, but it isn’t on the front burner. Relaxed attention lies somewhere between meditation, where you completely clear your mind, and the laser-like focus you apply when tackling a tough math problem. Our brains can make cognitive leaps when we’re not completely obsessed with a challenge, which is why good ideas sometimes come to us when we’re in the shower or talking a walk or on a long drive.

Unfortunately, our education system provides ever shrinking opportunities for students to engage in the types of activities that lead to relaxed attention:

in both the UK and US education systems, since the late 1980s, the trend has been away from unstructured play and time studying the arts—both prime times for switching gears into relaxed cognition—and toward more structured, standardized National Curriculums. According to the report, this focus on finding the single right answer for the test instead of exploring many alternate solutions has resulted in “a significant decline in creative thinking scores in US schools. Using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), and a sample of 272,599 pupils (kindergarten to fourth grade), evidence suggests that the decline is steady and persistent [affecting] teachers’ and pupils’ ability to think creatively, imaginatively and flexibly.”

Luckily, Brown offers three suggestions on how to enhance your own and your students’ creative capacity through engaging relaxed attention.

Source: Why Daydreamers Will Save the World, published February 24, 2014.

Mitch Resnick On Creating Opportunities For Children To Learn By Designing, Creating, Experimenting & Exploring …*

Mitch Resnick On Creating Opportunities For Children To Learn By Designing, Creating, Experimenting & Exploring ...*  | rethinked.org

Mitch Resnick, Papert Professor of Learning Research and director of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at MIT Media Lab, shares some valuable insights on the importance of developing creative thinkers and the various tools and processes to build creative learning experiences. Enjoy the highlights below and read the full interview here.

| THE IMPACT OF THE KINDERGARTEN APPROACH TO LEARNING |

We call the group Lifelong Kindergarten because we’re inspired by the way children learn in kindergarten. In the classic kindergarten, children are constantly designing and creating things in collaboration with one another. They build towers with wooden blocks and make pictures with finger paints—and we think they learn a lot in the process.

What we want to do with our new technology and activities is extend that kindergarten approach to learning, to learners of all ages. So everybody can continue to learn in a kindergarten style, but to learn more advanced and sophisticated ideas over time.

| THE NEED FOR CREATIVE THINKERS | 

The process of making things in the world—creating things; it provides us with the opportunity to take the ideas that we have in our mind and to represent them out in the world. Once we do that, it sparks new ideas. So there’s this constant back and forth between having new ideas in your mind, creating things in the world, and that process sparking new ideas in the mind which lets you create new things. So it’s this constant spiral of creating and generating new ideas.

We live in a world that is changing more rapidly than ever before. Things that you learn today could be obsolete tomorrow. But one thing is for sure: People will confront unexpected situations and unexpected challenges in the future. So what’s going to be most important is for kids to be able to come up with new and innovative solutions to the new challenges that arise. That’s why it’s so important to develop as a creative thinker. Just knowing a fixed set of facts and skills is not enough. The ability to think and act creatively will be the most important ingredient for success in the future.

| THE POWER OF CODING TO LEARN |

Although coding does provide some economic opportunities for jobs and careers, I think the most important reason for learning to code is it lets you organize your ideas and express your ideas. Coding lets you learn many other things. So that’s why I think what’s most important is not just learning to code, but coding to learn. As you’re learning to code, you’re learning many other things.

[ …]

Before you can think about changing living standards, you need to change learning standards. I think computer science provides new opportunities to help people become better learners. I think the thing that’s going to guarantee success in the future is people developing as creative thinkers and creative learners. Doing creative work with technology through learning to code is one pathway to that. It’s not the only pathway. But I think what’s probably the most important thing is having young people grow up with opportunities to think and act creatively. That’s the key.

| RETHINKING …* ALL SCHOOL SUBJECTS TO FACILITATE CREATIVE EXPRESSION |

We should make sure all subjects are taught in a way where kids get a chance to learn through creative expression. And not just computer programming. In a science class or physics class or biology class, teachers should allow students to have creative learning experiences.

We should rethink all school subjects so there are opportunities for children to learn by designing, creating, experimenting and exploring. That’s also true when we use computers. We should use computers to design, create, experiment and explore. But we should apply those ideas to all classes and all media.

Source: Interview: Mitchel Resnick via Maris, West & Baker Advertising, published February 8, 2014.

Friday Link Fest…*

Friday Link Fest...* | rethinked.org

 

READ

From Google Ventures: 4 Steps For Combining The Hacker Way With Design Thinking ~ via FastCo.Design, published March 11, 2013.

Teaching Government How To Fail ~ via MIT Center for Civic Media, published March 6, 2013.

Why I Hacked Donkey Kong for My Daughter ~ “How can I play as the girl? I want to save Mario!” via Wired Game Life, published March 11, 2013.

Young inventor’s flash idea to scare off lions ~ Richard Turere’s Lion Lights. via BBC, published March 13, 2013.

Twelve Things You Are Not Taught in Schools About Creative Thinking ~ via Think Jar Collective.

Creative Pro Tip: “Take Things Away Until You Cry” ~ via 99u, published March 10, 2013.

WATCH

Charles & Ray Eames’ Iconic Film Powers of Ten (1977) and the Lesser-Known Prototype from 1968 ~ via Open Culture, published March 12, 2013.

A Lesson in Empathy ~ via Tim Brown, published March 13, 2013.

Steve Keil: A manifesto for play, for Bulgaria and beyond ~ via TED, published Jun 2011

Sagmeister & Walsh Discuss Why Fun And Risk-taking Are Important Factors For Design~ via The Creators Project, published March 12, 2013.

Malcolm Gladwell: Creative Types: Embrace Chaos ~ via Big Think, published April 23, 2012.

Watch this English Kid Pour Perfect Cappuccino From the Back of His Toyota ~ Imagination, tinkering & design thinking, via Grub Street New York, published March 12, 2013.

LOOK

Words Of Wisdom For Start-ups Made Into Typographic Wall Posters by Startup Vitamins ~ via Design Taxi, published March 11, 2013.

HistoryPin: An Online Time Machine ~ via Messy Nessy Chic, published March 5, 2013.

FOUND: new Tumblr from National Geographic archives showcasing photographs that reveal cultures & moments of the past.

Friday Link Fest…*

READ

Relax! You’ll Be More Productive ~ via The New York Times, published February 9, 2013.

In praise of failure: The key ingredient to children’s success, experts say, is not success ~ On grit as a key component of success. via National Post, published February 2, 2013.

Social Emotional Learning Core Competencies ~ Rethinking…* the definition of academic success. via Q.E.D. Foundation, published February 11, 2013.

How to Save Science: Education, the Gender Gap, and the Next Generation of Creative Thinkers ~ via Brainpickings, published February 12, 2013

Arbonauts: of trees, data, and teens ~ The challenges & rewards of rapid prototyping as pedagogy. via Harvard’s MetaLab, published February 6, 2013.

Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper: A Low-Cost, High-Impact Approach ~ Rethinking…* the way that we do development. via Project for Public Spaces.

How Malawi is improving a terrible maternal mortality rate through good design ~ via TED News, published January 30, 2013

Tina Seelig On Unleashing Your Creative Potential ~ via 99u.

Why Even Radiologists Can Miss A Gorilla Hiding In Plain Sight ~ Rethinking…* the instructions we give to professionals to account for the fact that what we’re thinking about — what we’re focused on — filters the world around us so aggressively that it literally shapes what we see. via NPR, published February 11, 2013

LOOK

Artist Can Only Draw in his Sleep ~ via PSFK, published February 13, 2013.

Landscape artworks at Hogpen Hill Farms open house ~ photographs by Fredrick K.Orkin of Edward Tufte’s Hogpen Hill Farms LLC, his 242-acre tree and sculpture farm in northwest Connecticut. via EdwardTufte.com.

Four Amazing Mini Libraries That Will Inspire You to Read ~ More accessible to a larger population than a classic library, the Pop-Up Library preserves the intimacy and experience of the book. via GOOD, published February 13, 2013.

In Photo Series, When Math Meets Art ~ Nikki Graziano’s photo series, ‘Found Functions’, defies the commonly-thought notion of the boring and geeky subject. via Design Taxi, published February 9, 2013.

A Floating School That Won’t Flood ~ On cultivating a new type of urbanism on water in African cities. via FastCo.Exist, published February 8, 2013.

Pixar Artist Designs New Facebook Emoticons ~ Matt Jones is creating a set of digital images that reflect more complex or subtle emotions. via PSFK, published February 11, 2013.

WATCH

David Kelley on Making ~ via General Assembly, published February 2012.

The Scared Is Scared: A Child’s Wisdom for Starting New Chapters (Creative or Otherwise) in Life ~ Delightful meditation on embracing uncertainty. via Openculture, published February 11, 2013

Michael Jordan on Failure ~ via Nike, published August 25, 2006.

Color Me____ by Andy J. Miller & Andrew Neyer ~ via joustwebdesign, published October 23, 2012. (h/t Swissmiss.)

Tiny Sugar-Covered Bandaid Could Replace Needles For Vaccinations ~ Rethinking…* vaccines ~Scientists at King’s College London have developed a new way to administer vaccines, using a pain-free microneedle array. via PSFK, published February 12, 2013.

DO

25 Mini-Adventures in the Library ~ via Project for Public Spaces, published 

Want to Start a Makerspace at School? Tips to Get Started ~ via MindShiftKQED, published February 12, 2013

Rethinking…* what it Means to “Know Thyself” ~ Cognitive Empathy as the Great Art Form of the Age of Outrospection

“I think we need to think about bringing empathy into our every day lives in a very sort of habitual way. Socrates said that the way we live a wise and good life was to know thyself. And we’ve generally thought of that as being about being self-reflective, looking in at ourselves. It’s been about introspection. But I think, in the 21st century, we need to recognize that to know thyself is something that can also be achieved by stepping outside yourself, by discovering other people’s lives. And I think empathy is the way to revolutionize our own philosophies of life, to become more outrospective and to create the revolution of human relationships that I think we so desperately need.”

In this RSA Animate video, philosopher Roman Krznaric urges us to rethink…* our definition of “knowing thyself” by shifting our frame of reference from the 20th century notion of introspection to one of outrospection: “the idea of discovering who you are and what do to with your life by stepping outside yourself, discovering the lives of other people, other civilizations.” Krznaric identifies cognitive empathy–perspective taking, which is about understanding somebody else’s worldview, their beliefs, their fears, the experiences that shape how they look at the world and how they look at themselves–as the great art form of outrospection and the catalyst for revolutions of human relationships. The video walks you through the concept of outrospection while providing ideas on how to develop your own empathic capacity (hint: nurture your curiosity!) and how to live one’s life as a great empathic adventurer. The video is a mere ten minutes long and worth every second, but in case you don’t have time to view it just yet, I’ve transcribed my favorite quotes from it, which should give you a good general idea of what outrsopection is and how it can help us rethink…* and enhace our lives and relationships.

 theRSAorg on YouTube, published December 3, 2012

Instead of the age of introspection, we need to shift to the age of outrospection. And by outrospection I mean the idea of discovering who you are and what do to with your life by stepping outside yourself, discovering the lives of other people, other civilizations. And the ultimate art form for the age of outrospection is empathy.

[…] empathy can be part of the art of living; a philosophy of life. Empathy isn’t just something that expands your moral universe, empathy is something that can make you a more creative thinker, improve your relationships, can create the human bonds that make life worth living. But more than that, empathy is also about social change, radical social change.

A lot of people think of empathy as a sort of nice, soft, fluffy concept. I think it’s anything but that. I think it’s actually quite dangerous because empathy can create revolution. Not one of those old-fashioned revolutions of new states, policy, governments, laws, but something much more viral and dangerous, which is a revolution of human relationships.

Cognitive empathy, which is about perspective taking, about stepping into somebody else’s world—almost like an actor looking through the eyes of their character. It’s about understanding somebody else’s worldview, their beliefs, their fears, the experiences that shape how they look at the world and how they look at themselves.

We make assumptions about people; we have prejudices about people, which block us from seeing their uniqueness, their individuality. We use labels and highly empathic people get beyond that, or get beyond those labels, by nurturing their curiosity about others.

Highly empathic people tend to be very sensitive listeners; they’re very good at understanding what somebody else’s need are. They tend to also be people who, in conversation, share parts of their own lives, make conversations two-way dialogues, make themselves vulnerable.

Now, we normally think of empathy as something that happens between individuals. But I also believe it can be a collective force, it can happen on a mass scale. When I think of history, I think not of the rise and fall of civilizations and religions or political systems; I think of the rise and fall of empathy: moments of mass empathic flowering and also, of course, of empathic collapse.

I think we need new social institutions, we need, for example, empathy museums—a place, which is not about dusty exhibits, not like and old Victorian museum, but an experiential and conversational public space where you might walk in and in the first room there is a human library, where you can borrow people for conversations. You walk into the next room and there are twenty sewing machines and there are former Vietnamese sweatshop workers there who will teach you how to make a T-shirt, like the one you’re probably wearing, under sweatshop labor conditions and you’ll be paid five pence at the end of it so you understand the labor behind the label. You may well go into the café and scan in your food and discover the working conditions of those who picked the coffee beans in the drink that you’re drinking. You may see a video of them talking about their lives, trying to make a connection across time and space into realms that you don’t know about.

Mitch Resnick, Head of MIT’s Lifelong Kindergarten Group, on Coding To Learn…*

Mitch Resnick, head of  the  Lifelong Kindergarten group at MIT’s Media Lab, rethinks and expands the notion of ‘fluency’ in today’s digital landscape. Resnick observes that while young people are very comfortable ‘reading’ new technologies, very few of them have the ability to ‘write’ in new technologies. Resnick makes the claim that computer programming, far from being only useful to those who intend to become computer scientists or programmers, is beneficial to everyone, from young children learning to code using MIT’s Scratch–a programming language that is easy (and enjoyable!) to learn–to Resnick’s own 83 year old mother. Resnick makes a powerful analogy between learning to read which allows one to read to learn and learning to code, which, according to Resnick, allows one to then code to learn: “we become fluent in reading and writing. It’s not something that you’re doing just to become a professional writer, very few people will become professional writers, but it’s useful for everybody to learn how to read and write. Same thing with coding: most people won’t grow up to become professional computer scientists or programmers but those skills of thinking creatively, reasoning systematically, working collaboratively–skills you develop when you code in Scratch–are things that people can use no matter what they’re doing in their work lives. ”

 Enjoy & rethink…*

Reading, Writing, And Programming: Mitch Resnick At TEDXBeaconStreet

(TEDXTalks via YouTube, published January 17, 2013)

 

 Kids should learn programming as well as reading and writing {Boing Boing}

 

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