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Day 12/11/2012

Using Technology to Further Dialogue

With my day nearly complete, I stepped off the 242nd street platform and onto the awaiting 1 train. But two questions continued to swirl around in my head. During my daylong visit, I enjoyed connecting with members of the math and technology integration departments at RCS. I was thankful for the opportunity to observe experienced and capable educators performing their craft.

Yet I was most grateful for those two circling questions. The first question is how might students show themselves and their teachers what they know and don’t know? The second question is how might teachers converse amongst themselves about pedagogy given their packed and varied schedules? The former focuses on developing metacognitive awareness, which provides students with the ability to drive their own learning and maximize the resources provided by their teachers. The later focuses on the important task of making time for substantive and thoughtful collaboration with colleagues during busy schools days filled with teaching demands and the inevitable daily emergencies that routinely steal away a teacher’s attention.

I do not believe that computer-based technologies need to be the only quiver from which to pull solutions for these problems, but my conversations today brought the following solutions to light. Explain Everything, Show Me, and Educreation are three iPad apps that allow students to record their written and verbal work. These apps create opportunities for students and their teachers to retroactively see and reflect on what students were thinking. These accurate documentations of reasoning  can be completed for a homework assignment done at the kitchen table, or coursework completed in class.

VoiceThread provides a platform for asynchronous communications. By agreeing on a an acceptable window of time for responses, users of the software can submit their comments at their leisure. Teachers can use this tool to write, speak, or video record their responses or their thoughts on a professional development topic. Participants can return and review new post or the virtual conversation can be the basis of subsequent in-person meetings. The pre-work completed in the initial virtual meetings could increase the productivity of live meetings.

At their core I believe these two sets of tools could enhance academic dialogue both in the virtual and in-person setting. They provide accurate documentation of thoughts and an opportunity for multiple individuals to digest the documented material at their own pace. I am excited to start playing around with these different applications and would love to hear your feedback if you have any experience with these tools.

On Looking: Roland Barthes on the Difficulties of Naming the Essence of Photography

Roland Barthes‘ last book, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, published posthumously, was born out of his grieving the death of his mother. It was while sorting and looking at pictures of his mother, that this touching rumination on the essence of photography, affect, the self, perception and memory emerged. Barthes’ reflections on photography and perception are thought-provoking and essential to our understanding and appreciation of making the familiar unknown. Celebrate what would have been Barthes’ 97th birthday today with these excerpts from Camera Lucida.

  

(Roland Barthes, via TracesOfTheReal.com)

 

First of all, I did not escape, or try to escape, from a paradox: on the one hand the desire to give a name to Photography’s essence and then to sketch an eidetic science of the Photograph; and on the other the intractable feeling that Photography is essentially (a contradiction in terms) only contingency, singularity, risk: my photographs would always participate, as Lyotard says, in “something or other”: is it not the very weakness of Photography, this difficulty in existing which we call banality? Next, my phenomenology agreed to compromise with a power, affect; affect was what I didn’t want to reduce, being irreducible, it was thereby what I wanted, what I ought to reduce the Photograph to; but could I retain an affective intentionality, a view of the objects which was immediately steeped in desire, repulsion, nostalgia, euphoria? Classical phenomenology, the kind I had known in my adolescence (and there has not been any other since), had never, so far as I could remember, spoken of desire or of mourning. Of course I could make out in Photography, in a very orthodox manner, a whole network of essences: material essences (necessitating the physical, chemical, optical study of the Photograph), and regional essences (deriving, for instance, from aesthetics, from History, from sociology); but at the moment of reaching the essence of Photography in general, I branched off; instead of following the path of a formal ontology (of a Logic), I stopped, keeping with me, like a treasure, my desire or my grief, the anticipated essence of the Photograph could not, in my mind, be separated from the “pathos” of which, from the first glance, it consists. I was like that friend who had turned to Photography only because it allowed him to photograph his son. As Spectator I was interested in Photography only for “sentimental” reasons; I wanted to explore it not as a question (a theme) but as a wound: I see, I feel, hence I notice, I observe, and I think.

 

(Photograph by Koen Wessing: Nicaragua. 1979 via Stanford.edu )

 

My rule was plausible enough for me to try to name (as I would need to do) these two elements whose co-presence established, it seemed, the particular interest I took in these photographs.

The first, obviously, is an extent, it has the extension of a field, which I perceive quite familiarly as a consequence of my knowledge, my culture; this field can be more or less stylized, more or less successful, depending on the photographer’s skill or luck, but it always refers to a classical body of information: rebellion, Nicaragua, and all the signs of both: wretched uniformed soldiers, ruined streets, corpses, grief, the sun, and the heavy-lidded Indian eyes. Thousands of photographs consist of this field, and in these photographs I can, of course, take a kind of general interest, one that is even stirred sometimes, but in regard to them my emotion requires the rational intermediary of an ethical and political culture. What I feel about these photographs derives from an average affect, almost from a certain training. I did not know a French word which might account for this kind of human interest, but I believe this word exists in Latin: it is studium, which doesn’t mean, at least not immediately “study,” but application to a thing, taste for someone, a kind of general enthusiastic commitment, of course, but without special acuity. It is by studium that I am interested in so many photographs, whether I receive them as political testimony or enjoy them as good historical scenes: for it is culturally (this connotation is present in studium) that I participate in the figures, the faces, the gestures, the settings, the actions.

The second element will break (or punctuate) the studium. This time it is not I who seeks it out (as I invest the field of the studium with my sovereign consciousness), it is this element which rises from the scene, shoots out of it like an arrow, and pierces me. A Latin word exists to designate this wound, this prick, this mark made by a pointed instrument: the word suits me all the better in that it also refers to the notion of punctuation, and because the photographs I am speaking of are in effect punctuated, sometimes even speckled with these sensitive points; precisely, these marks, these wounds are so many points. This second element which will disturb the studium I shall therefore call punctum; for punctum is also: sting, speck, cut, little hole—and also a cast of the dice. A photograph’s punctum is that accident which pricks me (but also bruises me, is poignant to me).

 

Since the Photograph is pure contingency and can be nothing else (it is always something that is represented)–contrary to the text which, by the sudden action of a single word, can shift a sentence from description to reflection–it immediately yields up to those “details” which constitute the very raw material of ethnological knowledge.

 

What I can name cannot really prick me. The incapacity to name is a good symptom of disturbance.

 

Nothing surprising, then, if sometimes, despite its clarity, the punctum should be revealed only after the fact, when the photograph is no longer in front of me and I think back on it. I may know better a photograph I remember than a photograph I am looking at, as if direct vision oriented its language wrongly,  engaging it in an effort of description which will always miss its point of effect, the punctum.

 

Ultimately–or at the limit–in order to see a photograph well, it is best to look away or close your eyes. “The necessary condition for an image is sight,” Janouch told Kafka; and Kafka smiled and replied: “We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds. My stories are a way of shutting my eyes.” The photograph must be silent (there are blustering photographs, and I don’t like them): this is not a question of discretion but of music. Absolute subjectivity is achieved only in a state, an effort, of silence (shutting your eyes is to make the image speak in silence). The photograph touches me if I withdraw it from its usual blah-blah: “Technique,” “Reality,” “Reportage,” “Art,” etc.: to say nothing, to shut my eyes, to allow the detail to rise of its own accord into affective consciousness.

*

 

For the Roland Barthes buffs among you, head on over to UBU web for audio recordings of his lectures: Comment vivre ensemble” (“How to live together“), Lectures at the Collège de France, (1977); “Le Neutre” (“The Neutral“), Lectures at the Collège de France, (1978) and a free version of Barthes’ 1967 essay, The Death of the Author. Enjoy & Rethink…

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